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Updated: 2 hours 39 min ago

Preventing Supply Chain Attacks like SolarWinds

Wed, 01/13/2021 - 22:54

In late 2020, it was revealed that the SolarWinds Orion software, which is in use by numerous US Government agencies and many private organizations, was severely compromised. This was an incredibly dangerous set of supply chain compromises that the information technology community (including the Open Source community) needs to learn from and take action on.

The US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) released an alert noting that the SolarWinds Orion software included malicious functionality in March 2020, but it was not detected until December 2020. CISA’s Emergency Directive 21-01 stated that it was being exploited, had a high potential of compromise, and a grave impact on entire organizations when compromised. Indeed, because Orion deployments typically control networks of whole organizations, this is a grave problem. The more people look, the worse it gets. As I write this, it appears that a second and third malware have been identified in Orion.

Why the SolarWinds Attack Is Particularly Noteworthy

What’s especially noteworthy is how the malicious code was inserted into Orion: the attackers subverted something called the build environment. When software is being developed it is converted (compiled) from source code (the text that software developers update) into an executable package using a “build process.” For example, the source code of many open source software projects is then used in software that is built, compiled, and redistributed by other organizations, so that it is ready to install and run on various computing platforms. In the case of SolarWinds’ Orion, CrowdStrike found a piece of malware called Sunspot that watched the build server for build commands and silently replaced source code files inside the Orion app with files that loaded the Sunburst malware. The SolarWinds Orion compromise by Sunspot isn’t the first example of these kinds of attacks, but it has demonstrated just how dangerous they can be when they compromise widely-used software.

Unfortunately, a lot of conventional security advice cannot counter this kind of attack: 

SolarWinds’ Orion is not open source software. Only the company’s developers can legally review, modify, or redistribute its source code or its build system and configurations. If we needed further evidence that obscurity of software source code doesn’t automatically provide security, this is it.

Recommendations from The Linux Foundation 

Organizations need to harden their build environments against attackers. SolarWinds followed some poor practices, such as using the insecure ftp protocol and publicly revealing passwords, which may have made these attacks especially easy. The build system is a critical production system, and it should be treated like one, with the same or higher security requirements as its production environments. This is an important short-term step that organizations should already be doing. However, it’s not clear that these particular weaknesses were exploited or that such hardening would have made any difference. Assuming a system can “never be broken into” is a failing strategy.

In the longer term, I know of only one strong countermeasure for this kind of attack: verified reproducible builds. A “reproducible build” is a build that always produces the same outputs given the same inputs so that the build results can be verified. A verified reproducible build is a process where independent organizations produce a build from source code and verify that the built results come from the claimed source code. Almost all software today is not reproducible, but there’s work to change this. The Linux Foundation and Civil Infrastructure Platform has been funding work, including the Reproducible Builds project, to make it possible to have verified reproducible builds.

The software industry needs to begin shifting towards implementing and requiring verified reproducible builds. This will not be easy. Most software is not designed to be reproducible in their build environments today, so it may take years to make software reproducible. Many changes must be made to make software reproducible, so resources (time and money) are often needed. And there’s a lot of software that needs to be reproducible, including operating system packages and library level packages. There are package distribution systems that would need to be reviewed and likely modified. I would expect some of the most critical software to become reproducible first, and then less critical software would increase over time as pressure increases to make more software verified reproducible. It would be wise to develop widely-applicable standards and best practices for creating reproducible builds. Once software is reproducible, others will need to verify the build results for given source code to counter these kinds of attacks. Reproducible builds are much easier for open source software (OSS) because there’s no legal impediment to having many verifiers. Closed source software developers will have added challenges; their business models often depend on hiding source code. It’s still possible to have “trusted rebuilders” worldwide to verify closed source software, even though it’s more challenging and the number of rebuilders would necessarily be smaller.

The information technology industry is generally moving away from “black boxes” that cannot be inspected and verified and towards components that can be reviewed. So this is part of a general industry trend; it’s a trend that needs to be accelerated.

This is not unprecedented. Auditors have access to the financial data and review the financial systems of most enterprises. Audits are an independent entity verifying the data and systems for the benefit of the ecosystem. There is a similar opportunity for organizations to become independent verifiers for both open source and closed source software and build systems. 

Attackers will always take the easiest path, so we can’t ignore other attacks. Today most attacks exploit unintentional vulnerabilities in code, so we need to continue to work to prevent these unintentional vulnerabilities. These mitigations include changing tools & interfaces so those problems won’t happen, educating developers on developing secure software (such as the free courses from OpenSSF on edX), and detecting residual vulnerabilities before deployment through various detection tools. The Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) is working on improving the security of open source software (OSS), including all these points.

Applications are mostly reused software (with a small amount of custom code), so this reused software’s software supply chain is critical. Reused components are often extremely out-of-date. Thus, they have many publicly-known unintentional vulnerabilities; in fact, reused components with known vulnerabilities are among the topmost common problems in web applications. The LF’s LFX security tools, GitHub’s Dependabot, GitLab’s dependency analyzers, and many other tools & services can help detect reused components with known vulnerabilities.

Vulnerabilities in widely-reused OSS can cause widespread problems, so the LF is already working to identify such OSS so that it can be reviewed and hardened further (see Vulnerabilities in the Core Preliminary Report and Census II of Open Source Software).

The supply chain matters for malicious code, too; most malicious code gets into applications through library “typosquatting” (that is, by creating a malicious library with a name that looks like a legitimate library). 

That means that Users need to start asking for a software bill of materials (SBOM) so they will know what they are using. The US National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) has been encouraging the adoption of SBOMs throughout organizations and the software supply chain process. The Linux Foundation’s Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) format is a SBOM format by many. Once you get SBOM information, examine the versions that are included. If the software has malicious components, or components with known vulnerabilities, start asking why. Some vulnerabilities may not be exploitable, but too many application developers simply don’t update dependencies even when they are exploitable. To be fair, there’s a chicken-and-egg problem here: specifications are in the process of being updated, tools are in development, and many software producers aren’t ready to provide SBOMs.  So users should not expect that most software producers will have SBOMs ready today. However, they do need to create a demand for SBOMs.

Similarly, software producers should work towards providing SBOM information. For many OSS projects this can typically be done, at least in part, by providing package management information that identifies their direct and indirect dependencies (e.g., in package.json, requirements.txt, Gemfile, Gemfile.lock, and similar files). Many tools can combine this information to create more complete SBOM information for larger systems.

Organizations should invest in OpenChain conformance and require their suppliers to implement a process designed to improve trust in a supply chain.  OpenChain’s conformance process reveals specifics about the components you depend on that are a critical first step to countering many supply chain attacks.

Conclusion

The attack on SolarWinds’ Orion will have devastating effects for years to come. But we can and should learn from it. 

We can:

  1. Harden software build environments
  2. Move towards verified reproducible builds 
  3. Change tools & interfaces so unintentional vulnerabilities are less likely
  4. Educate developers (such as the free courses from OpenSSF on edX)
  5. Use vulnerability detection tools when developing software
  6. Use tools to detect known-vulnerable components when developing software
  7. Improve widely-used OSS (the OpenSSF is working on this)
  8. Ask for a software bill of materials (SBOMs), e.g., in SPDX format. Many software producers aren’t ready to provide one yet, but creating the demand will speed progress
  9. Determine if subcomponents we use have known vulnerabilities 
  10. Work towards providing SBOM information if we produce software for others
  11. Implement OpenChain 

Let’s make it much harder to exploit the future systems we all depend on. Those who do not learn from history are often doomed to repeat it.

David A. Wheeler, Director of Open Source Supply Chain Security at the Linux Foundation

The post Preventing Supply Chain Attacks like SolarWinds appeared first on Linux Foundation.

Dent Introduces Industry’s First End-to-End Networking Stack Designed for the Modern Distributed Enterprise Edge and Powered by Linux

Fri, 12/18/2020 - 01:16
  • Dent issues “Arthur”, its First Code Release that Delivers an Open, Simplified Networking Operating System for next-generation retail and campus networks
  •  Linux Foundation announces inaugural Dent general members committed to delivering enterprise-grade, disaggregated networks through an open ecosystem

SAN FRANCISCO, December 17, 2020 The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced Arthur — the first code release of Dent, a project to enable the creation of a Network Operating System (NOS) for Disaggregated Network Switches in campus and remote enterprise locations. Since its December 2019 launch, several companies have joined Dent as general members, including Innovium, Arcadyan, Aviz Netorks, and Alpha Networks who are joined by Dent premier members Amazon, Delta Electronics Inc, Marvell, NVIDIA, Edgecore Networks, and Wistron NeWeb (WNC).

The Arthur release – aptly named after Arthur Dent, the protagonist character of Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy– uses the recently released Linux 5.6 Kernel and leverages SwitchDev to simplify integrations, eliminate complex abstractions and SDK change management, and support existing Linux tool chains. In addition to providing the industry’s widest range of hardware options, the Arthur release includes over 25 key features to enable enterprise infrastructure teams to safely transition to disaggregated networks.

“With the Arthur release, we’re witnessing the makings of an open network operating system, control plane and management plane that will transform how enterprises address their distributed edge challenges,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge and IoT, at The Linux Foundation. “The DENT community has grown quickly and executed on this first major code release at a time when the entire industry is rethinking the future of retail and campus environments.”

The networking industry is moving away from customized, proprietary solutions for telecom, cloud and enterprise data center markets in favor of open standards. However, these open advancements have failed to meet the specific needs of distributed enterprise edge networking, such as a simplified networking OS stack that is low cost and Linux-based. DENT enables an open community to build this solution without complicated abstractions. It uses the Linux Kernel, Switchdev, and other Linux-based projects to allow developers to treat networking ASICs and silicon like any other hardware. This simple disaggregated Linux/SwitchDev-based switch ultimately simplifies integration across the ecosystem and encourages application developers to adopt this new standard.

For more information, please visit dent.dev

Premier Member Quotes

“Open networking is the future, and Delta is proud to be a part of the momentum with the Dent project,” said Honda Wu, vice president of Solutions and Open Source at Delta. “Our goal is to support the initial users of Dent with our deep knowledge and expertise in networking.”

“As a leading provider of open networking solutions for data centers and enterprises, Edgecore is pleased to see the release of dentOS for next-generation retail and campus networks through the open community ecosystem. Disaggregated hardware and open source enables more enterprise and campus network customers to enjoy the benefits of open networking.” Michael Ward, vice president, Business Development, Software, Edgecore Networks.

“As a leading silicon provider in access networking, we remain committed to supporting industry standard application interfaces on our switch portfolio, allowing our customers to leverage the full network operating software ecosystem. Dent is a key component to our offerings,” said Gavin Cato, vice president of product management and marketing at Marvell. “The Arthur release is running on multiple 1G and 10G platform deployments incorporating Marvell’s feature-rich Prestera® Ethernet switches. This milestone demonstrates our commitment to bringing innovative solutions for automated and personalized experiences within the borderless enterprise across the smart edge and retail networking.”

“Dent’s Arthur release is a major step towards accelerating the open source networking revolution that NVIDIA has spearheaded for years,” said Amit Katz, vice president of Ethernet Switches at NVIDIA Networking. “Dent OS, an open source network operating system, leverages the wide Linux ecosystem to provide freedom of choice for modern data centers and edge deployments. By providing the industry leading ASIC and software innovations such as FRRouting, SwitchDev, and several other kernel networking contributions, we look forward to pushing the advancement of Dent.”

“The Arthur release incorporates intelligent wireless and wireline capabilities critical to any enterprise’s decision to embrace open software architecture,” said Larry Lee, executive vice president and general manager of the Networking Business Group at WNC. “We and other industry leaders supporting Dent worked closely together to tackle distributed switching for the initial retail use case.”

General Member Quotes

“As a leading provider of high performance and innovative switch silicon solutions that have been deployed at scale by multiple top customers, Innovium is a big champion for open, standards-based and disaggregated networking solutions. We are excited to be part of Linux Foundation’s open-source Denthttps://dent.dev/ project, which aims to deliver those benefits combined with a compelling TCO,” said Amit Sanyal, vice president of Marketing at Innovium.

“With more than 17 years of Tier-1 Operators networking experience, Arcadyan is glad to join Dent and looking forward to making contributions to the software ecosystem,” said Jenny Yang, director at Arcadyan.

“Aviz Networks recently joined the Dent project and the Open Verification Lab (OVL) initiative in partnership with Keysight providing test expertise and a vendor neutral test facility for the Dent community. Aviz and Keysight will continue to lead the Dent test working group to ensure the highest quality for future Dent releases,” said the Aviz Networks team.

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

 

The post Dent Introduces Industry’s First End-to-End Networking Stack Designed for the Modern Distributed Enterprise Edge and Powered by Linux appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

Open Mainframe Project Welcomes New Project Tessia, HCL Technologies and Red Hat to its Ecosystem

Fri, 12/18/2020 - 00:57

SAN FRANCISCO, December 17, 2020 The Open Mainframe Project (OMP), an open source initiative that enables collaboration across the mainframe community to develop shared tool sets and resources, today welcomes Tessia, a tool that automates and simplifies the installation, configuration and testing of Linux systems running on the Z platform, to its ecosystem. Additionally, HCL Technologies and Red Hat join the project to strengthen their commitment to open source mainframe technologies.

“Open Mainframe Project has experienced record growth this year in terms of membership and projects,” said John Mertic, Director of Program Management at the Linux Foundation. “We look forward to strengthening our role as the number one resource for programs that advance the technology and training for the mainframe, especially with new members HCL and Red Hat who will expand our leadership and expertise.”

OMP Projects Increase by 1500 Percent Since Launch

When Open Mainframe Project was launched in 2015 by The Linux Foundation, there was one open source project under its wing that helped advance mainframe technology. Today, OMP has become an umbrella project that is home to 16 different open source projects including a COBOL Working Group and a Zowe Conformance Program. This is a 1500 percent increase over time.

Today, Tessia joins ADE, Ambitus, ATOM, CBT Tape, COBOL Training Program, Feilong, GenevaERS, Mainframe Open Education, Mentorship, Polycephaly, Software Discovery Tool, TerseDecompress, Zowe and Zorow as projects led by the Open Mainframe community.

Tessia, an open source project for Z resource management and automated installation of Linux distribution, manages relationships between Z datacenter resources and allocates them to specific projects and users according to a role-based schema. Using these resources, Tessia can be included into existing pipelines  and with pre-release distributions and drive faster release cycles and adoption of new technologies. Additionally, it enables developers to effortlessly bring up their environments or try out new releases before migration. In general, the mission of the new project improves experience with Linux on Z, which in turn facilitates faster adoption of open source on Z platform.

The OMP Ecosystem Increases by 225 Percent

The Open Mainframe Project, which launched with 12 founding members, is now comprised of 41 business and academic organizations including the newest members HCL Technologies and Red Hat. HCL is a leading global technology company with three main businesses including IT and Business Services (ITBS), Engineering and R&D Services (ERS) and HCL Software. HCL Software develops IBM mainframe software products as an IBM IP Partner as well as developing HCL-branded mainframe software products.

Red Hat, which is now a subsidiary of OMP Platinum member IBM, has a long history of building and supporting products and solutions from open source projects and giving back to those communities.

The new members will collaborate on vendor-neutral open source projects with the mission of building community and adoption of open source on the mainframe. The project strives to build an inclusive community through investment in open source projects and programs, career development, and events that provide opportunities for the mainframe community to collaborate and create sustainability.

To celebrate its 5th anniversary, Open Mainframe Project hosted its inaugural Open Mainframe Summit event in September. More than 385 seasoned professionals, developers, students and leaders from 175 companies attended the virtual conference to share best practices, discuss hot topics, and network with like-minded individuals who are passionate about the mainframe industry. Learn more about the event and the audience statistics in this blog.

Momentum for Open Mainframe Projects

As an umbrella, the Open Mainframe Project hosts projects that expand training the next generation of mainframers or how modern mainframe technology integrates with existing systems. Through the vendor-neutral governance structure, OMP invites developers and members worldwide to participate in the open source community. The community’s passionate and talent has helped move several of the Open Mainframe Projects to important milestones including:  

Zowe, an open source software framework for the mainframe that strengthens integration with modern enterprise applications, has released version 1.17 with some notable features and enhancements. Learn more in the release notes.

Polycephaly, a set of Java and Groovy classes that enables building z/OS® source code files with Jenkins and Git, now offers developers an opportunity to choose their IDEs to use, including the popular Open Source Eclipse. Learn more in this blog.

The annual Open Mainframe Project Mentorship program, which has helped more than 40 students learn more and gain experience with Linux, open source, and mainframes, welcomed 11 new mentees in May. These mentees were paired with mentors from OMP member organizations such as IBM, Rocket Software, SUSE, Vicom Infinity, and Zoss Team LLC for four months and delivered a presentation at the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit Europe. The videos can be found here.

Students interested in participating in the 2021 Open Mainframe Project mentorship program can join a webinar on January 12th, 2021 at 10:00 am US Eastern Time to learn more about the program and projects participating. Register here for this webinar.

About the Open Mainframe Project

The Open Mainframe Project is intended to serve as a focal point for deployment and use of Linux and Open Source in a mainframe computing environment. With a vision of Open Source on the Mainframe as the standard for enterprise class systems and applications, the project’s mission is to build community and adoption of Open Source on the mainframe by eliminating barriers to Open Source adoption on the mainframe, demonstrating value of the mainframe on technical and business levels, and strengthening collaboration points and resources for the community to thrive. Learn more about the project at https://www.openmainframeproject.org.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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The post Open Mainframe Project Welcomes New Project Tessia, HCL Technologies and Red Hat to its Ecosystem appeared first on The Linux Foundation.

Dent Introduces Industry’s First End-to-End Networking Stack Designed for the Modern Distributed Enterprise Edge and Powered by Linux

Fri, 12/18/2020 - 00:00
  • Dent issues “Arthur”, its First Code Release that Delivers an Open, Simplified Networking Operating System for next-generation retail and campus networks
  • Linux Foundation announces inaugural Dent general members committed to delivering enterprise-grade, disaggregated networks through an open ecosystem

SAN FRANCISCO, December 17, 2020 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced Arthur — the first code release of Dent, a project to enable the creation of a Network Operating System (NOS) for Disaggregated Network Switches in campus and remote enterprise locations. Since its December 2019 launch, several companies have joined Dent as general members, including Innovium, Arcadyan, Aviz Netorks, and Alpha Networks who are joined by Dent premier members Amazon, Delta Electronics Inc, Marvell, NVIDIA, Edgecore Networks, and Wistron NeWeb (WNC).

The Arthur release – aptly named after Arthur Dent, the protagonist character of Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy– uses the recently released Linux 5.6 Kernel and leverages SwitchDev to simplify integrations, eliminate complex abstractions and SDK change management, and support existing Linux tool chains. In addition to providing the industry’s widest range of hardware options, the Arthur release includes over 25 key features to enable enterprise infrastructure teams to safely transition to disaggregated networks.

“With the Arthur release, we’re witnessing the makings of an open network operating system, control plane and management plane that will transform how enterprises address their distributed edge challenges,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge and IoT, at The Linux Foundation. “The DENT community has grown quickly and executed on this first major code release at a time when the entire industry is rethinking the future of retail and campus environments.”

The networking industry is moving away from customized, proprietary solutions for telecom, cloud and enterprise data center markets in favor of open standards. However, these open advancements have failed to meet the specific needs of distributed enterprise edge networking, such as a simplified networking OS stack that is low cost and Linux-based. DENT enables an open community to build this solution without complicated abstractions. It uses the Linux Kernel, Switchdev, and other Linux-based projects to allow developers to treat networking ASICs and silicon like any other hardware. This simple disaggregated Linux/SwitchDev-based switch ultimately simplifies integration across the ecosystem and encourages application developers to adopt this new standard.

For more information, please visit dent.dev

Premier Member Quotes

“Open networking is the future, and Delta is proud to be a part of the momentum with the Dent project,” said Honda Wu, vice president of Solutions and Open Source at Delta. “Our goal is to support the initial users of Dent with our deep knowledge and expertise in networking.”

“As a leading provider of open networking solutions for data centers and enterprises, Edgecore is pleased to see the release of dentOS for next-generation retail and campus networks through the open community ecosystem. Disaggregated hardware and open source enables more enterprise and campus network customers to enjoy the benefits of open networking.” Michael Ward, vice president, Business Development, Software, Edgecore Networks.

“As a leading silicon provider in access networking, we remain committed to supporting industry standard application interfaces on our switch portfolio, allowing our customers to leverage the full network operating software ecosystem. Dent is a key component to our offerings,” said Gavin Cato, vice president of product management and marketing at Marvell. “The Arthur release is running on multiple 1G and 10G platform deployments incorporating Marvell’s feature-rich Prestera® Ethernet switches. This milestone demonstrates our commitment to bringing innovative solutions for automated and personalized experiences within the borderless enterprise across the smart edge and retail networking.”

“Dent’s Arthur release is a major step towards accelerating the open source networking revolution that NVIDIA has spearheaded for years,” said Amit Katz, vice president of Ethernet Switches at NVIDIA Networking. “Dent OS, an open source network operating system, leverages the wide Linux ecosystem to provide freedom of choice for modern data centers and edge deployments. By providing the industry leading ASIC and software innovations such as FRRouting, SwitchDev, and several other kernel networking contributions, we look forward to pushing the advancement of Dent.”

“The Arthur release incorporates intelligent wireless and wireline capabilities critical to any enterprise’s decision to embrace open software architecture,” said Larry Lee, executive vice president and general manager of the Networking Business Group at WNC. “We and other industry leaders supporting Dent worked closely together to tackle distributed switching for the initial retail use case.”

General Member Quotes

“As a leading provider of high performance and innovative switch silicon solutions that have been deployed at scale by multiple top customers, Innovium is a big champion for open, standards-based and disaggregated networking solutions. We are excited to be part of Linux Foundation’s open-source Denthttps://dent.dev/ project, which aims to deliver those benefits combined with a compelling TCO,” said Amit Sanyal, vice president of Marketing at Innovium.

“With more than 17 years of Tier-1 Operators networking experience, Arcadyan is glad to join Dent and looking forward to making contributions to the software ecosystem,” said Jenny Yang, director at Arcadyan.

“Aviz Networks recently joined the Dent project and the Open Verification Lab (OVL) initiative in partnership with Keysight providing test expertise and a vendor neutral test facility for the Dent community. Aviz and Keysight will continue to lead the Dent test working group to ensure the highest quality for future Dent releases,” said the Aviz Networks team.

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

The post Dent Introduces Industry’s First End-to-End Networking Stack Designed for the Modern Distributed Enterprise Edge and Powered by Linux appeared first on Linux Foundation.

Open Mainframe Project Welcomes New Project Tessia, HCL Technologies and Red Hat to its Ecosystem

Thu, 12/17/2020 - 22:00

SAN FRANCISCO, December 17, 2020 – The Open Mainframe Project (OMP), an open source initiative that enables collaboration across the mainframe community to develop shared tool sets and resources, today welcomes Tessia, a tool that automates and simplifies the installation, configuration and testing of Linux systems running on the Z platform, to its ecosystem. Additionally, HCL Technologies and Red Hat join the project to strengthen their commitment to open source mainframe technologies.

“Open Mainframe Project has experienced record growth this year in terms of membership and projects,” said John Mertic, Director of Program Management at the Linux Foundation. “We look forward to strengthening our role as the number one resource for programs that advance the technology and training for the mainframe, especially with new members HCL and Red Hat who will expand our leadership and expertise.”

OMP Projects Increase by 1500 Percent Since Launch

When Open Mainframe Project was launched in 2015 by The Linux Foundation, there was one open source project under its wing that helped advance mainframe technology. Today, OMP has become an umbrella project that is home to 16 different open source projects including a COBOL Working Group and a Zowe Conformance Program. This is a 1500 percent increase over time.

Today, Tessia joins ADE, Ambitus, ATOM, CBT Tape, COBOL Training Program, Feilong, GenevaERS, Mainframe Open Education, Mentorship, Polycephaly, Software Discovery Tool, TerseDecompress, Zowe and Zorow as projects led by the Open Mainframe community.

Tessia, an open source project for Z resource management and automated installation of Linux distribution, manages relationships between Z datacenter resources and allocates them to specific projects and users according to a role-based schema. Using these resources, Tessia can be included into existing pipelines  and with pre-release distributions and drive faster release cycles and adoption of new technologies. Additionally, it enables developers to effortlessly bring up their environments or try out new releases before migration. In general, the mission of the new project improves experience with Linux on Z, which in turn facilitates faster adoption of open source on Z platform.

The OMP Ecosystem Increases by 225 Percent

The Open Mainframe Project, which launched with 12 founding members, is now comprised of 41 business and academic organizations including the newest members HCL Technologies and Red Hat. HCL is a leading global technology company with three main businesses including IT and Business Services (ITBS), Engineering and R&D Services (ERS) and HCL Software. HCL Software develops IBM mainframe software products as an IBM IP Partner as well as developing HCL-branded mainframe software products.

Red Hat, which is now a subsidiary of OMP Platinum member IBM, has a long history of building and supporting products and solutions from open source projects and giving back to those communities.

The new members will collaborate on vendor-neutral open source projects with the mission of building community and adoption of open source on the mainframe. The project strives to build an inclusive community through investment in open source projects and programs, career development, and events that provide opportunities for the mainframe community to collaborate and create sustainability.

To celebrate its 5th anniversary, Open Mainframe Project hosted its inaugural Open Mainframe Summit event in September. More than 385 seasoned professionals, developers, students and leaders from 175 companies attended the virtual conference to share best practices, discuss hot topics, and network with like-minded individuals who are passionate about the mainframe industry. Learn more about the event and the audience statistics in this blog.

Momentum for Open Mainframe Projects

As an umbrella, the Open Mainframe Project hosts projects that expand training the next generation of mainframers or how modern mainframe technology integrates with existing systems. Through the vendor-neutral governance structure, OMP invites developers and members worldwide to participate in the open source community. The community’s passionate and talent has helped move several of the Open Mainframe Projects to important milestones including: 

Zowe, an open source software framework for the mainframe that strengthens integration with modern enterprise applications, has released version 1.17 with some notable features and enhancements. Learn more in the release notes.

Polycephaly, a set of Java and Groovy classes that enables building z/OS® source code files with Jenkins and Git, now offers developers an opportunity to choose their IDEs to use, including the popular Open Source Eclipse. Learn more in this blog.

The annual Open Mainframe Project Mentorship program, which has helped more than 40 students learn more and gain experience with Linux, open source, and mainframes, welcomed 11 new mentees in May. These mentees were paired with mentors from OMP member organizations such as IBM, Rocket Software, SUSE, Vicom Infinity, and Zoss Team LLC for four months and delivered a presentation at the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit Europe. The videos can be found here.

Students interested in participating in the 2021 Open Mainframe Project mentorship program can join a webinar on January 12th, 2021 at 10:00 am US Eastern Time to learn more about the program and projects participating. Register here for this webinar.

About the Open Mainframe Project

The Open Mainframe Project is intended to serve as a focal point for deployment and use of Linux and Open Source in a mainframe computing environment. With a vision of Open Source on the Mainframe as the standard for enterprise class systems and applications, the project’s mission is to build community and adoption of Open Source on the mainframe by eliminating barriers to Open Source adoption on the mainframe, demonstrating value of the mainframe on technical and business levels, and strengthening collaboration points and resources for the community to thrive. Learn more about the project at https://www.openmainframeproject.org.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

###

The post Open Mainframe Project Welcomes New Project Tessia, HCL Technologies and Red Hat to its Ecosystem appeared first on Linux Foundation.

Centaurus Infrastructure Project Joins Linux Foundation to Advance Cloud Infrastructure for 5G, AI and Edge

Thu, 12/17/2020 - 01:00

Centaurus today is becoming a Linux Foundation Project. The Centaurus Infrastructure Project is a cloud infrastructure platform for building distributed cloud as well as a platform for modern cloud native computing. It supports applications and workloads for 5G, Edge and AI and unifies the orchestration, network provisioning and management of cloud compute and network resources at a regional scale. 

Founding members include Click2cloud, Distributed Systems, Futurewei, GridGain Systems, Reinvent Labs, SODA Foundation and Tu Wien Informatics. Centaurus is an umbrella project for modern distributed computing and hosts both Arktos and Mizar. Arktos is a compute cluster management system designed for large scale clouds, while Mizar is the high-performance cloud-network powered by eXpress Data Path (XDP) and Geneve protocol for high scale cloud. More members and projects are expected to be accepted in the coming months. 

“The market is changing and customers require a new kind of cloud infrastructure that will cater to modern applications and workloads for 5G, AI and Edge,” said Mike Dolan, senior vice president and general manager for Linux Foundation Projects. “Centaurus is a technical project with strategic vision, and we’re looking forward to a deep collaboration that advances cloud native computing for generations to come.” 

Current cloud infrastructure technology needs are evolving, requiring companies to manage a larger scale of compute and network resources across data centers and more quickly provision those resources. Centaurus unifies management across bare metal, VMs, containers and serverless, while reducing operational costs and delivering on the low latency and data privacy requirements of edge networks. Centaurus offers a consistent API experience to provision and manage virtual machines, containers, serverless and other types of cloud resources by  combining traditional (Infrastructure as a Service) IaaS and Platform as a Service (PaaS) layers into one common infrastructure platform that can simplify cloud management.

“The Linux Foundation’s support in expanding the Centaurus community will accelerate cloud native infrastructure for the most pressing compute and networking demands,” said Dr. Xiong Ying, the current acting TSC chair, Centaurus Infrastructure Project. “It’s large network of open source developers and projects already supporting this future will enable mass collaboration and important integrations for 5G, AI and Edge workloads.” 

To contribute to Centaurus, please visit: https://www.centauruscloud.io/

Supporting Member Quotes

Click2cloud
“Click2cloud has been part of the development of Centaurus, which is world class software that will lead organizations to have a clear transition from IaaS to Cloud Native Infrastructure. Click2cloud has already started a development program to enable the journey from IaaS (Openstack) to Cloud Native migration, 5G cloud based on Centaurus reference architecture to support the partner ecosystem. We are very excited for Centaurus to be a part of Linux Foundation,” said Prashant Mishra, CEO, Click2cloud. 

Futurewei
“Distributed cloud architecture is a natural evolution for cloud computing infrastructure. Centaurus is a cloud native infrastructure platform aiming to unify management and orchestration of virtual machines, containers, and other forms of cloud resources natively at scale and at the edge. We have seen many enterprise users and partners wanting a unified solution to build their distributed cloud to manage virtual machines, containers or bare metal-based applications running at cloud as well as at edge sites. We are very pleased to see, today, the Centaurus Infrastructure project becomes a Linux Foundation open-source project, providing an option for community and enterprise users to build their cloud infrastructure to run and manage next generation applications such as AI, 5G and IoT. We look forward to working with the open-source community to realize the vision of Centaurus,” said Dr. Xiong Ying, Sr. Technical VP, Head of Cloud Lab, Futurewei. 

GridGain Systems
“Creating and managing a unified and scalable distributed cloud infrastructure that extends from cloud to edge is increasingly a challenge for organizations worldwide. GridGain Systems has been a proud sponsor and active participant in the development of in-memory computing solutions to support the Centaurus project. We look forward to helping organizations realize the benefits of Centaurus and continuing to help extend its scalability and adoption,” said Nikita Ivanov, Co-Founder and CTO, GridGain Systems. 

Reinvent Labs
“We are a young company, which specializes in cloud computing and delivering cloud-native solutions to our customers across various industries. As such, we are ever stronger witnessing the need to manage cloud services and applications that span across complex and heterogeneous infrastructures, which combine containers, VMs and serverless functions. What is more, such infrastructures are also starting to grow beyond traditional cloud platforms towards the edge on the network. Being part of the Centaurus project will not only allow us to innovate in this space and deliver a platform for unified management of infrastructure resources across both large Cloud platforms and the Edge, but it will also enable us to connect and collaborate with like-minded members for thought leadership and industry best practices,” said Dr. Stefan Nastic, founder and CEO of Reinvent Labs GmbH. 

The SODA Foundation
“The SODA Open Data Framework is an open source data and storage management framework that goes from the edge to the core to the cloud. Centaurus offers the opportunity for SODA to be deployed in the next generation cloud infrastructure for 5G, AI and Edge, and allows both communities to innovate together,” said Steven Tan, SODA Foundation Chairman and VP & CTO Cloud Solution, Storage at Futurewei. 

TU Wien
“We are very excited to be part of the Centaurus ecosystem and honored to be part of this open source movement and contributing in the fields of IoT, Edge intelligence, and Edge and Cloud Computing, including networking and communication aspects, as well as orchestration, resource allocation, and task scheduling,” said Prof. Schahram Dustdar, IEEE Fellow, Member Academia Europaea Professor of Distributed Systems, TU Wien, Austria.

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Centaurus Infrastructure Project Joins Linux Foundation to Advance Cloud Infrastructure for 5G, AI and Edge

Thu, 12/17/2020 - 00:00

Centaurus today is becoming a Linux Foundation Project. The Centaurus Infrastructure Project is a cloud infrastructure platform for building distributed cloud as well as a platform for modern cloud native computing. It supports applications and workloads for 5G, Edge and AI and unifies the orchestration, network provisioning and management of cloud compute and network resources at a regional scale. 

Founding members include Click2cloud, Distributed Systems, Futurewei, GridGain Systems, Reinvent Labs, SODA Foundation and Tu Wien Informatics. Centaurus is an umbrella project for modern distributed computing and hosts both Arktos and Mizar. Arktos is a compute cluster management system designed for large scale clouds, while Mizar is the high-performance cloud-network powered by eXpress Data Path (XDP) and Geneve protocol for high scale cloud. More members and projects are expected to be accepted in the coming months. 

“The market is changing and customers require a new kind of cloud infrastructure that will cater to modern applications and workloads for 5G, AI and Edge,” said Mike Dolan, senior vice president and general manager for Linux Foundation Projects. “Centaurus is a technical project with strategic vision, and we’re looking forward to a deep collaboration that advances cloud native computing for generations to come.” 

Current cloud infrastructure technology needs are evolving, requiring companies to manage a larger scale of compute and network resources across data centers and more quickly provision those resources. Centaurus unifies management across bare metal, VMs, containers and serverless, while reducing operational costs and delivering on the low latency and data privacy requirements of edge networks. Centaurus offers a consistent API experience to provision and manage virtual machines, containers, serverless and other types of cloud resources by  combining traditional (Infrastructure as a Service) IaaS and Platform as a Service (PaaS) layers into one common infrastructure platform that can simplify cloud management.

“The Linux Foundation’s support in expanding the Centaurus community will accelerate cloud native infrastructure for the most pressing compute and networking demands,” said Dr. Xiong Ying, the current acting TSC chair, Centaurus Infrastructure Project. “It’s large network of open source developers and projects already supporting this future will enable mass collaboration and important integrations for 5G, AI and Edge workloads.” 

To contribute to Centaurus, please visit: https://www.centauruscloud.io/

Supporting Member Quotes

Click2cloud
“Click2cloud has been part of the development of Centaurus, which is world class software that will lead organizations to have a clear transition from IaaS to Cloud Native Infrastructure. Click2cloud has already started a development program to enable the journey from IaaS (Openstack) to Cloud Native migration, 5G cloud based on Centaurus reference architecture to support the partner ecosystem. We are very excited for Centaurus to be a part of Linux Foundation,” said Prashant Mishra, CEO, Click2cloud. 

Futurewei
“Distributed cloud architecture is a natural evolution for cloud computing infrastructure. Centaurus is a cloud native infrastructure platform aiming to unify management and orchestration of virtual machines, containers, and other forms of cloud resources natively at scale and at the edge. We have seen many enterprise users and partners wanting a unified solution to build their distributed cloud to manage virtual machines, containers or bare metal-based applications running at cloud as well as at edge sites. We are very pleased to see, today, the Centaurus Infrastructure project becomes a Linux Foundation open-source project, providing an option for community and enterprise users to build their cloud infrastructure to run and manage next generation applications such as AI, 5G and IoT. We look forward to working with the open-source community to realize the vision of Centaurus,” said Dr. Xiong Ying, Sr. Technical VP, Head of Cloud Lab, Futurewei. 

GridGain Systems
“Creating and managing a unified and scalable distributed cloud infrastructure that extends from cloud to edge is increasingly a challenge for organizations worldwide. GridGain Systems has been a proud sponsor and active participant in the development of in-memory computing solutions to support the Centaurus project. We look forward to helping organizations realize the benefits of Centaurus and continuing to help extend its scalability and adoption,” said Nikita Ivanov, Co-Founder and CTO, GridGain Systems. 

Reinvent Labs
“We are a young company, which specializes in cloud computing and delivering cloud-native solutions to our customers across various industries. As such, we are ever stronger witnessing the need to manage cloud services and applications that span across complex and heterogeneous infrastructures, which combine containers, VMs and serverless functions. What is more, such infrastructures are also starting to grow beyond traditional cloud platforms towards the edge on the network. Being part of the Centaurus project will not only allow us to innovate in this space and deliver a platform for unified management of infrastructure resources across both large Cloud platforms and the Edge, but it will also enable us to connect and collaborate with like-minded members for thought leadership and industry best practices,” said Dr. Stefan Nastic, founder and CEO of Reinvent Labs GmbH. 

The SODA Foundation
“The SODA Open Data Framework is an open source data and storage management framework that goes from the edge to the core to the cloud. Centaurus offers the opportunity for SODA to be deployed in the next generation cloud infrastructure for 5G, AI and Edge, and allows both communities to innovate together,” said Steven Tan, SODA Foundation Chairman and VP & CTO Cloud Solution, Storage at Futurewei. 

TU Wien
“We are very excited to be part of the Centaurus ecosystem and honored to be part of this open source movement and contributing in the fields of IoT, Edge intelligence, and Edge and Cloud Computing, including networking and communication aspects, as well as orchestration, resource allocation, and task scheduling,” said Prof. Schahram Dustdar, IEEE Fellow, Member Academia Europaea Professor of Distributed Systems, TU Wien, Austria.

 

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EdgeX Foundry, the Leading IoT Open Source Framework, Simplifies Deployment with the Latest Hanoi Release, New Use Cases and Ecosystem Resources

Fri, 12/11/2020 - 01:00

EdgeX Foundry, the Leading IoT Open Source Framework, Simplifies Deployment with the Latest Hanoi Release, New Use Cases and Ecosystem Resources

  • EdgeX’s Hanoi release offers better data tagging, customized editing and a new Command Line Interface for improved performance and scalability
  • New use cases across AI, IIoT, Manufacturing and Retail as part of the Adopter Video Series
  • Resources to get developers started on the platform, contributor case studies and a library of commercial offerings as part of the new EdgeX Foundry Website

SAN FRANCISCODecember 10, 2020EdgeX Foundry, a project under the LF Edge umbrella organization within the Linux Foundation that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for IoT edge computing independent of connectivity protocol, hardware, operating system, applications or cloud, today announced the “Hanoi” release that makes IoT deployment easier and the launch of new ecosystem resources.

“EdgeX Foundry fosters an ecosystem of interoperable components from a variety of vendors to create a much-needed IoT framework for edge solutions,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Automation, Edge and IoT, the Linux Foundation. “With the support of LF Edge members and EdgeX contributors from across the globe, we are paving the way to enable and support a more robust solution at the IoT, Enterprise, Cloud and Telco edge.”

Launched in April 2017, and now part of the LF Edge umbrella, EdgeX Foundry is an open source, loosely-coupled microservices framework that provides the choice to plug and play from a growing ecosystem of available third-party offerings or to augment proprietary innovations. With a focus on the IoT Edge, EdgeX simplifies the process to design, develop and deploy solutions across industrial, enterprise, and consumer applications.

The Hanoi Release

EdgeX Foundry’s Hanoi release is the seventh consecutive semi-annual release and has a number of features including simplified deployment, improved performance and scalability testing and launch of Command Line Interface (CLI). Hanoi also incorporates the first collection of new, platform-wide micro service APIs that allows adopters to get a feel for what’s coming with EdgeX 2.0 in the spring.

Key features include:

  • Launch of the CLI: allows developers and users to issue a variety of EdgeX API calls to its services using terminal commands for easier scripting of tasks.
  • Improved edge data tagging: developers can tag the data coming from a variety of edges, so that everything is organized and configured by a preferred process that ensures the location of data can be found more quickly and efficiently.
  • Easier and simplified deployment: users will find that EdgeX now has a Compose file “make” capability that allows users to more easily customize their file without a lot of manual editing.
  • Improved performance and scalability testing: Adopters can now calculate what a large-scale deployment with EdgeX would look, and put it in their roadmap plans. Hanoi brings the ability to provide guidance around EdgeX scaling as the amount of data is pushed through the system, or how many devices of particular types you can hang on an instance of EdgeX.

EdgeX Foundry has a history of working closely with other LF Edge projects including Akraino, Home Edge, EVE and Open Horizon. With the Hanoi release, EdgeX has provided a sample service to export data from EdgeX to Fledge, an industrial IoT framework that focuses on critical operations, predictive maintenance, situational awareness and safety.  This allows EdgeX device connectors and capabilities to be used with Fledge instances. Conversely, with its next release, Fledge intends to provide a device service to allow Fledge instances to feed EdgeX instances.

To learn more about the Hanoi release, check out this blog post.

Moving Forward

The next step for EdgeX Foundry is the “Ireland” release, tentatively scheduled for spring 2021. Ireland will include a number of significant changes, including; EdgeX’s new V2 API set and V2 API testing;  additional security improvements;  and easier transition/communication between device services to message application services directly (allowing for better quality of service when needed and bypassing persistence when not needed).

New Ecosystem Resources

The new EdgeX Foundry website features a variety of resources that will help new developers get started, learn about new commercial offerings from LF Edge members and see the framework in action in real-world use cases across Artificial Intelligence (AI), Industrial IoT (IIoT), Manufacturing, and Retail. The recently launched Adopter Series showcases companies that already deploy the EdgeX framework in products and solutions including Accenture, HP, Intel, Jiangxing Intelligence, ThunderSoft and TIBCO.

Additionally, Canonical, an LF Edge member and long-time EdgeX Foundry contributor, has taken over the management of the EdgeX Snap Store. Since the Dehli release, the community has published EdgeX snap packages for desktop, cloud and IoT that are easy to install, secure, cross‐platform and dependency‐free.

“With this release, we are committing to the maintenance and publishing of the official EdgeX snaps in the Canonical Snap Store,” said Tony Espy, Canonical’s EdgeX  Engineering Manager. “Taking over management of the EdgeX snap is an important step toward providing developers with a safe and secure path forward for their customers.”

Additional resources:

For more information about LF Edge and its projects, visit https://www.lfedge.org/

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

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New Open Source Contributor Report from Linux Foundation and Harvard Identifies Motivations and Opportunities for Improving Software Security

Wed, 12/09/2020 - 00:00

New survey reveals why contributors work on open source projects and how much time they spend on security

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., December 8, 2020 – The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) and the Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard (LISH) today announced the release of a new report, “Report on the 2020 FOSS Contributor Survey,” which details the findings of a contributor survey administered by the organizations and focused on how contributors engage with open source software. The research is part of an ongoing effort to study and identify ways to improve the security and sustainability of open source software.

The FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) contributor survey and report follow the Census II analysis released earlier this year. This combined pair of works represents important steps towards understanding and addressing structural and security complexities in the modern-day supply chain where open source is pervasive but not always understood. Census II identified the most commonly used free and open source software (FOSS) components in production applications, while the FOSS Contributor Survey and report shares findings directly from nearly 1,200 respondents working on them and other FOSS software.

“The modern economy – both digital and physical – is increasingly reliant on free and open source software,” said Frank Nagle, assistant professor at Harvard Business School. “Understanding FOSS contributor motivations and behavior is a key piece of ensuring the future security and sustainability of this critical infrastructure.”

Key findings from the FOSS Contributor Survey include:

  • The top three motivations for contributors are non-monetary. While the overwhelming majority of respondents (74.87 percent) are already employed full-time and more than half (51.65 percent) are specifically paid to develop FOSS, motivations to contribute focused on adding a needed feature or fix, enjoyment of learning and fulfilling a need for creative or enjoyable work.
  • There is a clear need to dedicate more effort to the security of FOSS, but the burden should not fall solely on contributors. Respondents report spending, on average, just 2.27 percent of their total contribution time on security and express little desire to increase that time. The report authors suggest alternative methods to incentivizing security-related efforts.
  • As more contributors are paid by their employer to contribute, stakeholders need to balance corporate and project interests. The survey revealed that nearly half (48.7 percent) of respondents are paid by their employer to contribute to FOSS, suggesting strong support for the stability and sustainability of open source projects but drawing into question what happens if corporate interest in a project diminishes or ceases.
  • Companies should continue the positive trend of corporate support for employees’ contribution to FOSS. More than 45.45 percent of respondents stated they are free to contribute to FOSS without asking permission, compared to 35.84 percent ten years ago. However, 17.48 percent of respondents say their companies have unclear policies on whether they can contribute and 5.59 percent were unaware of what  policies – if any – their employer had.

“Understanding open source contributor behaviors, especially as they relate to security, can help us better apply resources and attention to the world’s most-used software,” said David A. Wheeler, director of open source supply chain security at the Linux Foundation. “It is clear from the 2020 findings that we need to take steps to improve security without overburdening contributors and the findings suggest several ways to do that.”

For an in-depth analysis of these findings, suggested actions and more, please access the full report here: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/blog/2020/12/download-the-report-on-the-2020-foss-contributor-survey

The report authors are Frank Nagle, Harvard Business School; David A. Wheeler, the Linux Foundation; Hila Lifshitz-Assaf, New York University; and Haylee Ham and Jennifer L. Hoffman, Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard. They will host a webinar tomorrow, December 9, at 10 am ET. Please register here: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/webinar-why-wont-developers-write-secure-os-software/

The FOSS Contributor Report & Survey is expected to take place again in 2021. For contributors who would like to participate, please sign up here: https://hbs.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_erjkjzXJ2Eo0TDD

About the OpenSSF

Hosted by the Linux Foundation, the OpenSSF is a cross-industry organization that brings together the industry’s most important open source security initiatives and the individuals and companies that support them. It combines the Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII), founded in response to the 2014 Heartbleed bug, and the Open Source Security Coalition, founded by the GitHub Security Lab, to build a community to support the open source security for decades to come. The OpenSSF is committed to collaboration and working both upstream and with existing communities to advance open source security for all.

About LISH

As a university-wide initiative, the Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard (LISH) is spurring the development of a science of innovation through a systematic program of solving real-world innovation challenges while simultaneously conducting rigorous scientific research. To date, LISH has worked with key partners in aerospace and healthcare, such as NASA, the Harvard Medical School, the Broad Institute, and the Scripps Research Institute to solve complex problems and develop impactful solutions. More information can be found at https://lish.harvard.edu/

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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Story Changes Culture
503-867-2304
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The Janssen Project Takes on World’s Most Demanding Digital Trust Challenges at Linux Foundation

Wed, 12/09/2020 - 00:00

New Janssen Project seeks to build the world’s fastest and most comprehensive cloud native identity and access management software platform

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., December 8, 2020 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the Janssen Project, a cloud native identity and access management software platform that prioritizes security and performance for our digital society. Janssen is based on the Gluu Server and benefits from a rich set of signing and encryption functionalities. Engineers from IDEMIA, F5, BioID, Couchbase and Gluu will make up the Technical Steering Committee.

Online trust is a fundamental challenge to our digital society. The Internet has connected us. But at the same time, it has undermined trust. Digital identity starts with a connection between a person and a digital device. Identity software conveys the integrity of that connection from the user’s device to a complex web of backend services. Solving the challenge of digital identity is foundational to achieving trustworthy online security.

While other identity and access management platforms exist, the Janssen Project seeks to tackle the most challenging security and performance requirements. Based on the latest code that powers the Gluu Server–which has passed more OpenID self-certification tests than any other platform–Janssen starts with a rich set of signing and encryption functionality that can be used for high assurance transactions. Having shown throughput of more than one billion authentications per day, the software can also handle the most demanding requirements for concurrency thanks to Kubernetes auto-scaling and advances in persistence.

“Trust and security are not competitive advantages–no one wins in an insecure society with low trust,” said Mike Schwartz, Chair of the Janssen Project Technical Steering Committee. “In the world of software, nothing builds trust like the open source development methodology. For organizations who cannot outsource trust, the Janssen Project strives to bring transparency, best practices and collective governance to the long-term maintenance of this important effort. The Linux Foundation provides the neutral and proven forum for organizations to collaborate on this work.”

The Gluu engineering teams chose the Linux Foundation to host this community because of the Foundation’s priority of transparency in the development process and its formal framework for governance to facilitate collaboration among commercial partners.

New digital identity challenges arise constantly, and new standards are developed to address them. Open source ecosystems are an engine for innovation to filter and adapt to changing requirements. The Janssen Project Technical Steering Committee (“TSC”) will help govern priorities according to the charter.  The initial TSC includes:

  • Michael Schwartz, TSC Chair, CEO Gluu
  • Rajesh Bavanantham, Domain Architect at F5 Networks/NGiNX
  • Rod Boothby, Head of Digital Trust at Santander
  • Will Cayo, Director of Software Engineering at IDEMIA Digital Labs
  • Ian McCloy, Principal Product Manager at Couchbase
  • Alexander Werner, Software Engineer at BioID

For more information, see the project Github site: https://github.com/JanssenProject

Supporting Comments

BioID

“BioID’s biometric authentication service provides GDPR compliant, device independent, 3D liveness detection and facial recognition APIs, supported out-of-the-box by the Janssen project. Exposing BioID’s capabilities via OpenID Connect makes sense in many cases, especially as part of the rollout for a large organization.  The availability of a high-quality open source implementation of OpenID Connect gives us more options to build products and to expand the options for our customers to deploy our technology,” said Alexander Werner, Software Engineer at BioID.

Couchbase

“The Couchbase database is supported today in the Janssen project for both caching and persistence. This makes sense given the distributed, elastic, in-memory requirements for a multi-cloud, hyper-scale identity service. Contributing to this project aligns with our goal to advance open source infrastructure software that results in more options for the Couchbase community,” said Ian McCloy, Principal Product Manager at Couchbase.

F5

“It’s an immense pleasure to join the Janssen Project, as it’s aimed to improve the performance, reliability and security on OAuth2 Components that are similar to NGINX Principles. Being part of Linux Foundation, the Janssen Project will be well governed and evolve with the open source community to achieve its goals,” said Rajesh Bavanantham, F5.

IDEMIA

“I have been a part of the Gluu community for many years. I’m excited to see the project moving to the Linux Foundation where we can collaborate with an even larger ecosystem of individuals and companies,” said Will Cayo, IDEMIA.

 

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,500 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

 

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Media Contact
Jennifer Cloer
Story Changes Culture
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jennifer@storychangesculture.com

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Download the Report on the 2020 FOSS Contributor Survey

Tue, 12/08/2020 - 21:00

Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) has become a critical part of the modern economy. It has been estimated that FOSS constitutes 80-90% of any given piece of modern software, and software is an increasingly vital resource in nearly all industries. This heavy reliance on FOSS is common in both the public and private sectors, in both tech and non-tech organizations. Therefore, ensuring the health and security of FOSS is critical to the future of nearly all industries in the modern economy.

To better understand the state of security and sustainability in the FOSS ecosystem, and how organizations and companies can support it, the Linux Foundation‘s Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) and the Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard (LISH) collaborated to conduct a widespread survey of FOSS contributors as part of larger efforts to take a pre-emptive approach to strengthen cybersecurity by improving open-source software security. 

These efforts — recently incorporated into the Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) working group on securing critical projects — aim to support, protect, and fortify open software, especially software critical to the global information infrastructure.

This survey’s primary goal is to identify how best to improve FOSS’s security and sustainability — especially those projects that are widely relied upon by the modern economy. Specifically, the survey seeks to help answer the question,

“How can we better incentivize adequate maintenance and security of the most used FOSS projects?”

Importantly, in conducting this survey, the research team sought to take a holistic view of security. The methodology for recruiting survey participants emphasized contributors to FOSS projects that have been identified as widely used via previous research that culminated in the release of “CII Census II Preliminary Report – Vulnerabilities in the Core.”

This new report summarizes the results of a survey of free/open source software (FOSS) developers in 2020. The goal was to identify key issues in improving FOSS’s security and sustainability since the world now depends on it as a critical infrastructure that underlies the modern economy. 

To capture a cross-section of the FOSS community, the research team distributed the survey to contributors to the most widely used open source projects and invited the wider FOSS contributor community through an open invitation. It captured more technical aspects of security and also considered the more human side. 

The survey included questions about contributor motivations and level of involvement, corporate involvement in FOSS, the role of economic considerations in contribution behavior, and sought to answer the following:

  1. Demographics: What are the demographics of FOSS contributors? In particular, what are their gender, employment, and geographic location?
  2. Motivations: What are their reasons for starting, continuing, or stopping contributions to FOSS? How can projects keep contributors engaged, and do contributors feel that their employers or others value their work?
  3. Pay: How many FOSS contributors are paid for their work on FOSS? If paid, by whom (e.g., by employers and/or corporate sponsorship)? If they are not, does the lack of payment lead to significantly poorer security or sustainability?
  4. Time Spent: How much time do contributors spend contributing to FOSS, and how would they like to spend it? Is there an interest in increasing time spent on security issues?
  5. Aid: What kinds of actions from external actors would help improve security (e.g., code contributions and/or money)?
  6. Current activity: What kinds of security-related activities are already taking place in the FOSS projects represented by the respondents?
  7. Education/training: How much education/training have FOSS contributors had in secure software development and operations? From which sources did they receive it?

The goals in running this survey were to understand the state of security and sustainability in FOSS and identify opportunities to improve them, and ensure FOSS’s viability in the future. In particular, this survey focused on the “human side” of FOSS, more than the technical side, although the two are certainly inter-related, and these findings relate to both. 

The results identified reasons for optimism about the future of FOSS (individuals are continuing to contribute to FOSS, companies are becoming friendlier to FOSS to the point of paying some employees to contribute, etc.), but also areas of concern (in particular, the lack of security-related efforts, and potential difficulties in motivating such efforts). 

In the end, free and open source software is, and always has been, a community-driven effort that has led to the development of some of the most critical building blocks of the modern economy. This survey highlights the importance of the security of this important dynamic asset. Likewise, it will take a community-driven effort, including individuals, companies, and institutions, to ensure FOSS is secure and sustainable for future generations.

Authors:

  • Frank Nagle, Harvard Business School
  • David A. Wheeler, The Linux Foundation
  • Hila Lifshitz-Assaf, New York University 
  • Haylee Ham, Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard
  • Jennifer L. Hoffman, Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard 
Download Report

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Download the 2020 Linux Foundation Annual Report

Thu, 12/03/2020 - 22:00

2020 has been a year of challenges for the Linux Foundation (“LF”) and our hosted communities. During this pandemic, we’ve all seen our daily lives and those of many of our colleagues, friends, and family around the world completely changed. Too many in our community also grieved over the loss of family and friends.

It was uplifting to see LF members join the fight against COVID-19. Our members worldwide contributed technical resources for scientific researchers, offered assistance to struggling families and individuals, contributed to national and international efforts, and some even came together to create open source projects under LF Public Health to help countries deal with the pandemic.

Our project communities continued to grow this year, with new initiatives across many open technology segments, open standards, open data, and open hardware. We welcomed over 150 new communities to the LF this year, including the FINOS Foundation, which serves as an umbrella home for open source financial services projects.

Our events team had to undergo a significant transformation, pivoting over a few weeks from in-person to virtual events ranging from under 100 to tens of thousands of participants. These virtual gatherings helped many in our communities connect during this difficult time. We also learned much about potentially offering a more inclusive experience by providing hybrid in-person events with virtual experiences in the future. We’ve missed seeing many in our communities in person this year and look forward to seeing you all again when it is safe to do so.

Our training and certification team was able to help over 1.7 million individuals who enrolled in our free training courses. I want to congratulate the more than 40,000 persons who received LF certifications this year.

The LF’s 2020 Jobs Report shows trained and certified open source professionals are in demand and can easily demonstrate their value despite the challenging business environment.

As part of our ongoing diversity efforts and in joining the fight against inequality, our communities are focused on how they use language in their projects and finding mentors to guide the next generation of contributors. Our communities, such as the Linux kernel team and the Inclusive Naming Initiative launched at KubeCon North America, stepped up to enable progress in how we interact.

This year was a breakout year for our Joint Development Foundation and open standards communities. We welcomed six new projects building open standards. JDF has also been approved as an ISO/IEC JTC 1 Publicly Available Specification (PAS) Submitter. This year also marked that our first open standard community, OpenChain, was formally recognized as an international standard through the PAS process. Today the Linux Foundation can take our communities from open source repository to a recognized global standard.

Many in our ecosystem have stepped up to help with security efforts this year. A new community, Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF), launched to coordinate efforts focused on improving the security of open-source software.

While we continue to battle challenges in the US, we also reaffirm that the LF is part of a global community.

Our members had to navigate a year of changes in international trade policies and learned open source thrives despite politics. From around the world, our member communities engage in open collaboration because it is open, neutral, and transparent. Those participants clearly desire to continue collaborating with their global peers on challenges large and small.

At the end of a difficult year, all this taken together leaves us assured that open collaboration is the model for solving the world’s most complex challenges. No single person, organization, or government alone can create the technology we need to solve our most pressing problems. On behalf of the entire Linux Foundation team, we look forward to helping you and our communities take on whatever challenges come next.

 

Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

Download Report

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Open Source Web Engine Servo to be Hosted at Linux Foundation

Wed, 11/18/2020 - 00:00

The popular and lightning-fast web engine built using the Rust programming language will grow the community and expand its platform footprint

KubeCon, November 17, 2020 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it will host the Servo web engine. Servo is an open source, high-performance browser engine designed for both application and embedded use and is written in the Rust programming language, bringing lightning-fast performance and memory safety to browser internals. Industry support for this move is coming from Futurewei, Let’s Encrypt, Mozilla, Samsung, and Three.js, among others.

“The Linux Foundation’s track record for hosting and supporting the world’s most ubiquitous open source technologies makes it the natural home for growing the Servo community and increasing its platform support,” said Alan Jeffrey, Technical Chair of the Servo project. “There’s a lot of development work and opportunities for our Servo Technical Steering Committee to consider, and we know this cross-industry open source collaboration model will enable us to accelerate the highest priorities for web developers.”

Servo is an open source project that delivers components that can load, run, and display web pages, applications, and immersive WebXR experiences. Developers can integrate the Servo web engine — including a parallelized CSS engine that speeds page load times and improves stability and a rendering engine called WebRender — into their own user interfaces, 3D experiences, and other products. Servo currently runs on Linux, macOS, and Windows, and has been ported to devices such as Android phones, Oculus, Magic Leap, and Microsoft’s HoloLens. Servo was instrumental in building Mozilla’s Gecko browser engine that powered the launch of the Firefox Quantum web browser in 2017, and is still core to Firefox’s DNA today.

In 2012, Mozilla started the Servo project, a community effort to create a new, open source browser engine that can take advantage of multicore hardware to improve speed, stability, and responsiveness. Today, Servo is more efficient than most web engines because it takes advantage of low-power multi-core CPUs. This is enabled by the open source Rust programming language that focuses on speed, memory safety, and parallelism. Rust and Servo co-evolved, and during their early days, Servo was the only large-scale Rust program other than the Rust compiler itself. Rust’s memory safety guarantees mean that Servo presents a smaller attack surface for security vulnerabilities such as buffer overflow attacks. Rust and Servo were both incubated by Mozilla, and the next step for Servo is through the Linux Foundation.

“Mozilla is a champion of the open source movement, working to unite passionate communities to build software that keeps the internet open and accessible to all,” said Adam Seligman, Chief Operating Officer at Mozilla. “We’re pleased to see Servo graduate from Mozilla and move on to the Linux Foundation where we know this technology will continue to thrive and power web-based innovation in the future.”

“Servo is the most promising, modern, and open web engine for building applications and immersive experiences using web technologies, and that has a lot to do with the Rust programming language,” said Mike Dolan, senior vice president, and general manager of projects at the Linux Foundation. “We’re excited to support and sustain this important work for decades to come.”

For more information about the Servo project and to contribute, please visit servo.org.

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,500 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Media Contact
Jennifer Cloer
503-867-2304
pr@linuxfoundation.org

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FINOS Launches Open Regtech Initiative as It Receives Record High Number of Open Source Contributions

Sat, 11/14/2020 - 03:48

Deutsche Bank, JPMorgan, ING, Alliance for Innovative Regulation (AIR) Contribute as Foundation Achieves Highest Monthly Commits in Its History

NEW YORK, NY / November 13, 2020 / At its annual, flagship Open Source Strategy Forum (OSSF) held virtually in conjunction with the Linux Foundation, FINOS (the Fintech Open Source Foundation), today announced the launch of its Open RegTech initiative, which aims to expand the successful open collaboration model built between financial institutions, fintech and technology firms to regulators and regtech companies. Additionally, FINOS announced a codebase contribution from Deutsche Bank of the Symphony Java Toolkit as well as the OpenMAMA project, which is led by JPMorgan, Deutsche Bank and several other FINOS members.

The announcement comes a day after FINOS announced six new members and also recorded the largest number of commits, the smallest unit of contribution, on its open source projects since its inception with a 40 percent growth with respect to the previous record.

“When we started the foundation two years ago, we couldn’t have predicted such a groundswell of support from the financial services industry for our community and are extremely proud of what we’ve accomplished,” said Gabriele Columbro, executive director, FINOS, whose mission is to foster adoption of open source, open standards, and collaborative software development practices in financial services. “This is just the beginning. By establishing an open source model for the regulatory community, building a strong project portfolio and adding active contributions from financial institutions, we have a unique opportunity to tackle other long-standing industry challenges.”

FINOS Board Approves Regulatory Special Interest Group (SIG) Led by ING and AIR
The FINOS board recently established the use of SIGs to bring together financial services stakeholders to define problem statements in specific areas that can be tackled through open source collaboration. Recognizing that efficiently defining and meeting financial services regulations is both critical and challenging, FINOS has created the “Regulation Innovation SIG”, led by AIR and supported by ING, for those interested in creating open source solutions for regulatory and compliance issues in financial services.

“The regulatory landscape is in need of a makeover, one that uses open source technology to help streamline regulatory interpretation and reporting through standardization and common approaches,” said Tosha Ellison, COO, FINOS and keynote speaker at OSSF. “FINOS believes that open source software and standards can change the way financial regulation is implemented, supervised and complied with, and is thrilled by the interest it has received from both regulators and the industry.”

“Global challenges need global solutions. That’s why at ING, we collaborate with others, both on existing platforms and on new ones we have yet to create,” said Ian Hollowbread, head of RegTech, ING Labs, ING. “Working together with open source communities, we can achieve greater coordination and bring standardization to regulatory processes to help proactively protect the financial services sector at large.”

OSSF keynote speaker Jo Ann Barefoot, CEO and co-founder of Alliance for Innovative Regulation (AIR) said: “As a former regulator, I know that agencies need to adopt a new, more coordinated approach that seeks to harmonize financial regulations and their implementation. The financial services industry and regulatory bodies have an opportunity to redesign the traditional regulatory framework using open source technology. We see great potential working with ING and FINOS to further that end.”

Deutsche Bank Contributes Open Source Symphony Java Toolkit

As industry adoption of the Symphony platform grows, and the use cases and trading scenarios for which it is being deployed expand, so too has the need grown to make Symphony’s capabilities available in what remains one of the most popular languages in financial services–Java.

A suite of libraries, which address common concerns around identity management, instance clustering, integration testing, “circle-of-trust” and building workflows, the Symphony Java Toolkit is now available through FINOS. Internally, these libraries have been deployed widely for delivering valuable client-focused functionality such as request-for-quote (RFQ), building orders, supporting chatbots and sharing axe information. Deutsche Bank will work with the community to continue building an open source, best-of-breed Java software stack that can be used by all Java developers working with Symphony.

“The Symphony Java Toolkit provides clients with an effective and powerful set of utilities to build Symphony solutions that drive their businesses forward,” said James Gibson, CIO of Deutsche Bank’s FIC Technology. “The toolkit makes it even easier for clients to connect with us, and other industry participants, to increase efficiencies, improve controls and create new opportunities for growth.”

“These libraries have been developed from the ground up within Deutsche Bank – they are interoperable together, are well documented, have been field-tested, with further modules and features added frequently,” said Rob Moffat, consultant at Deutsche Bank and the developer of this software. “The Symphony Java Toolkit follows in the footsteps of Plexus Interop and Waltz as the third collaborative project between Deutsche Bank and FINOS, all of which benefit from FINOS’ sound reputation within the open-source community and their impartial stewardship of projects within the finance industry.”

Deutsche Bank is already a leader in open source technology across the banking sector. This significant contribution to the community follows its Plexus Interop submission in 2017 that remains the largest outside open-source contribution to FINOS since its founding.

OpenMAMA Joins FINOS to Develop its Project for Market Data Sharing Across the Financial Service Industry
OpenMAMA‘s project maintainers include several FINOS members like JPMorgan, Deutsche Bank and Glue42, and was previously open sourced under the auspices of the Linux Foundation, and will now be consolidated under FINOS as the Linux Foundation wide umbrella for financial services collaboration. The project provides a high performance middleware agnostic messaging API that interfaces with a variety of message-oriented middleware systems. It provides a simplified way of sharing market data across investment banks, proprietary trading companies, hedge funds and data providers. It reduces the cost of ownership and time to market for these financial companies.

“We see significant value in Open MAMA becoming part of the FINOS open source ecosystem,” said Nigel Phelan, architecture lead for the market data services department within the Corporate and Investment Bank at JPMorgan Chase. “Open MAMA is strongly aligned with the FINOS community and its members, and we see a great opportunity to build upon our achievements to date.”

FINOS’s strong momentum is evidenced by a series of recently announced contributions in 2020, from members such as Goldman Sachs (Legend), Morgan Stanley (Morphir), Citi (DataHub) and Deutsche Bank (Waltz).

The announcement comes on the second day of FINOS’ Open Source Strategy Forum(OSSF), an annual conference recognizing leaders within the open source and financial services industry. The virtual conference will bring together experts for engaging conversations and breakout sessions on how to best leverage open source software to solve industry challenges.

Some notable keynotes include:

  • Open Remarks, Tosha Ellison, chief operating officer, FINOS
  • On the Importance of Securing the Open Source Supply Chain, Christopher Ferris, IBM fellow and CTO, Open Technology, IBM
  • FINOS Executive Director Gabriele Columbro in conversation with Neal Pawar, open source advocate and technology veteran
  • “The Future of Financial Regulation” featuring Jo Ann Barefoot and Matthew Van Buskirk, co-CEO, Hummingbird Regtech.
  • An interview with Dan Abramov, software engineer at Facebook, member of the React Core Team and co-author of Create React App

To check out sessions from today’s virtual conference, please visit: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/open-source-strategy-forum/program/schedule/.

About FINOS
FINOS (The Fintech Open Source Foundation) is a nonprofit whose mission is to foster adoption of open source, open standards and collaborative software development practices in financial services. It is the center for open source developers and the financial services industry to build new technology projects that have a lasting impact on business operations. As a regulatory compliant platform, the foundation enables developers from these competing organizations to collaborate on projects with a strong propensity for mutualization. It has enabled codebase contributions from both the buy- and sell-side firms and counts 33 major financial institutions, fintechs and technology consultancies as part of its membership. FINOS is also part of the Linux Foundation, the largest shared technology organization in the world.

Contact:
Jamie Kemp
+15164173975
jamie@calibercorporateadvisers.com

SOURCE: FINOS

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How to report security vulnerabilities to the Linux Foundation

Fri, 11/13/2020 - 06:22

We at The Linux Foundation (LF) work to develop secure software in our foundations and projects, and we also work to secure the infrastructure we use. But we’re all human, and mistakes can happen.

So if you discover a security vulnerability in something we do, please tell us!

If you find a security vulnerability in the software developed by one of our foundations or projects, please report the vulnerability directly to that foundation or project. For example, Linux kernel security vulnerabilities should be reported to <security@kernel.org> as described in security bugs. If the foundation/project doesn’t state how to report vulnerabilities, please ask them to do so. In many cases, one way to report vulnerabilities is to send an email to <security@DOMAIN>.

If you find a security vulnerability in the Linux Foundation’s infrastructure as a whole, please report it to <security@linuxfoundation.org>, as noted on our contact page.

For example, security researcher Hanno Böck recently alerted us that some of the retired linuxfoundation.org service subdomains were left delegated to some cloud services, making them potentially vulnerable to a subdomain takeover. Once we were alerted to that, the LF IT Ops Team quickly worked to eliminate the problem and will also be working on a way to monitor and alert about such problems in the future. We thank Hanno for alerting us!

We’re also working to make open source software (OSS) more secure in general. The Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) is a broad initiative to secure the OSS that we all depend on. Please check out the OpenSSF if you’re interested in learning more.

David A. Wheeler

Director, Open Source Supply Chain Security, The Linux Foundation

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FINOS Expands Financial Services Open Source Ecosystem with Six New Members and Creation of Associate Member Program for Nonprofits

Fri, 11/13/2020 - 05:40

Intel, SUSE and Diffblue Broaden Industry Representation in the Open Ecosystem for Financial Services; Associate Membership Provides Open Source On-Ramp for Nonprofits, Industry Consortia, Academic Institutions and Public Agencies

NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / November 12, 2020 / Today, at its annual flagship conference, the Open Source Strategy Forum (OSSF), the Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS), announced three new corporate members – Intel and SUSE, joining as gold members, and Diffblue at the silver level. FINOS also announced today the launch of its Associate Member Program and three inaugural associate members, the Alliance for Innovative Regulation (AIR), InterWork Alliance(IWA), and the International Swaps and Derivatives Association (ISDA).

“From big tech to financial institutions, from regulators to fintech vendors, we are bringing together a community that is actively contributing valuable IP and sweat equity because it has now realized how the ‘open source way’ has the concrete potential to solve long standing challenges in this industry and beyond,” said Gabriele Columbro, executive director, FINOS.

These six new members further broaden industry representation across FINOS’ membership base, which now includes over 10 financial institutions and 20 technology vendors. Today’s announcement is also the latest example of accelerating growth in FINOS membership in the last year; with today’s announcement, the total count of FINOS members is now 38. “Our continued growth in members reflects the ongoing shift in financial services as more institutions embrace open collaboration to drive new business models, reduce costs, attract and retain talent, and gain competitive advantage,” remarked Tosha Ellison, FINOS Chief Operating Officer.

“Open source in financial services is a positive-sum game,” added Columbro. “Not only does it help industry consortia and regulators resolve important and complex issues at the crossroads of policy and technology, but it also provides technology and fintech companies with the ability to generate business opportunities through a commercial open source ecosystem, especially for those who will enjoy a first-mover advantage by engaging early in communities like FINOS.”

Technology Companies Join the Financial Open Source Movement

Intel is joining FINOS as a gold member. The company is an industry leader, creating world-changing technologies that enable global progress and enrich lives. Intel is also one of the largest software organizations in the world, and a leader in the development of open source technology.

“Intel technology can help banks unleash the power of data to deliver real-time insights and more value to their customers,” said Mike Blalock, general manager for the financial services industry at Intel. “As a strategic partner with FINOS, we will actively collaborate with the open source community to deliver leading-edge hardware and help bring this transformation to reality.”

SUSE, also joining FINOS as a gold member, is similarly an open source innovator. The world’s largest independent open source company, SUSE is a leader in enterprise Linux, edge computing and artificial intelligence. Its container and cloud platforms and software-defined infrastructure, enable businesses to create, deploy, and manage workloads.

“SUSE is passionate about open source innovation. We foster the potential to simplify complexities, modernize systems and accelerate discovery in banks and financial institutions,” said Alan Clark, who leads the SUSE Industry Standards and New Initiatives Program. “SUSE is proud to be a contributing member of FINOS and we will collaborate and address industry challenges around financial technologies, data modeling, machine learning, edge computing, hybrid cloud, security and containerization. Building on our FinTech experience and partnerships, SUSE will be an active member and guidepost for the FINOS community.”

A spin-out from Oxford University backed by Goldman Sachs, Diffblue is the creator of one of the world’s first AI for code solutions that automates writing unit tests and will join FINOS as a silver member. Its first product, Cover, writes Java unit regression tests that help software teams to find bugs sooner and so ship faster, with fewer defects. Its pioneering technology, developed by researchers from the University of Oxford, is based on reinforcement learning.

“We’re thrilled to be joining FINOS as a silver member so that we can collaborate more broadly with our financial services customers on open source projects that matter to them,” said Mathew Lodge, CEO of Diffblue. “As a commercial open source company, Diffblue’s Community Edition is free for open source projects so we will be contributing both better tests and tools as part of the community.”

New Associate Members Showcase FINOS’ Capabilities Beyond Traditional Financial Services

FINOS’ Associate Membership is for nonprofits, foundations and academic institutions with complementary missions to FINOS. These organizations can contribute to projects and bring attention to the numerous applications of open source technology, while FINOS provides its expertise and battle-tested open source governance to enable faster innovation in these adjacent communities.

As the regulatory landscape is ever changing, globally, AIR, a nonprofit dedicated to modernizing the financial regulatory system, will share its expertise with FINOS to drive open source solutions that standardize the way financial regulation is implemented and supervised.

“The mission of FINOS and the open source orientation of the FINOS community are an ideal complement to the work we do with financial regulators,” said David Ehrich, executive director, AIR.

ISDA is a trade association for participants in the global derivatives market, with more than 925 member firms in 75 countries. A key part of ISDA’s role is the development of standards and mutualized industry solutions for the derivatives market, including the Common Domain Model (CDM), which establishes a set of digital standards for trade events and processes. ISDA joins FINOS as an associate member, having recently participated in the successful pilot of Legend, the data platform contributed to FINOS by Goldman Sachs.

“The standards developed by ISDA are critical to derivatives workflows and, by extension, tons of fintech use cases,” said Rob Underwood, Chief Development Officer of FINOS. “In the pilot phase of Legend, extensions to the CDM were built using Legend. ISDA was central to Legend’s pilot and that overall open sourcing effort.”

“ISDA has long produced standards and definitions for the derivatives industry, and we have been working to digitize and distribute those standards in formats that work best for the fintech community. Engaging with fintech firms and providing those standards in open source should result in a rapid development of industry solutions and contribute to the transformation of financial markets,” said Ian Sloyan, Director, Market Infrastructure and Technology, ISDA.

IWA is a nonprofit, member-led organization creating platform-neutral specifications and trusted certification to define how digital token business processes can interwork regardless of location or market segment. Areas of expected collaboration include specifications for tokenizing institutional bond and equity instruments.

“World-scale adoption of standards is accelerated when those standards can be paired with open source reference implementations,” said Paul DiMarzio, executive director, IWA. “The IWA is excited to collaborate with FINOS to build pairings between FINOS open source projects and the IWA business working groups standardizing tokenized services for financial services.”

The announcement comes on the first day of OSSF, which is an annual conference recognizing leaders within the open source and financial services industry. The virtual event will bring together experts for engaging conversations and breakout sessions on how to best leverage open source software to solve industry challenges.

Some notable keynotes include:

  • Opening Remarks by FINOS Chair and Global Head Kim Prado – RBC and Dov Katz FINOS Chair, Morgan Stanley
  • Welcome and Opening Remarks – Gabriele Columbro, executive director, FINOS
  • “Open Sourcing Legend: The Flagship of Goldman Sachs’ Data Strategy — and Now Yours?” – Pierre de Belen, managing director, Goldman Sachs
  • “Innovation + Security = Innovation Joy: Stop Sacrificing Customer Experience for Security” – John Jeremiah, product marketing leader & DevOps evangelist, GitLab
  • “Quickly Deliver Modern Open Source Projects and Services with Modularity, the Enterprise Open Source Way” – Alessandro Petroni, global director and head, strategy financial services, Red Hat
  • Talks with Sarah Novotny, open source wonk, Azure Office of the CTO, Microsoft and Alejandra Villagra, managing director, Citi

To check out sessions from today’s virtual conference, please visit: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/open-source-strategy-forum/program/schedule/.

About FINOS

FINOS (The Fintech Open Source Foundation) is a nonprofit whose mission is to foster adoption of open source, open standards and collaborative software development practices in financial services. It is the center for open source developers and the financial services industry to build new technology projects that have a lasting impact on business operations. As a regulatory compliant platform, the foundation enables developers from these competing organizations to collaborate on projects with a strong propensity for mutualization. It has enabled codebase contributions from both the buy- and sell-side firms and counts 33 major financial institutions, fintechs and technology consultancies as part of its membership. FINOS is also part of the Linux Foundation, the largest shared technology organization in the world.

FOR MEDIA INQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACT:
Stephen Sumner
Caliber Corporate Advisers
p. 917.985.6630 ext.15
stephen@calibercorporate.com

SOURCE: FINOS

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The Linux Foundation Launches LF Live: Mentorship Series

Tue, 11/10/2020 - 20:30

Open Source Maintainers and community leaders will host virtual mentorship sessions designed to provide expert knowledge and valuable interactive discussion across a range of topics related to the Linux Kernel and other OS projects, primarily around development. These Mentorship Webinars are free for anyone to attend, and are being offered to support the development of skills and further empowerment of the community. 

SAN FRANCISCO, November 10, 2020The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, is launching a virtual mentoring series entitled LF Live: Mentorship Series.  The goal of this program is to (1) continue offering opportunities to learn and re-skill to those that have been displaced from jobs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic; (2) serve those considering jobs in open source by helping to grow their skills and build their network so they are better set up for successful careers; (3) grow the number of people entering the open source job market which has a huge demand for new talent; and (4) encourage new people to apply to The Linux Foundation’s Mentoring Program and other community mentoring programs. These webinars will be complimentary. There is no cost to participate in this program.

Each webinar topic will be different, but will primarily be technical and applicable to the Linux Kernel, as well as to other open source projects. The first webinar was held on October 29 and covered ‘Writing Change Logs that Make Sense, led by Shuah Khan, Kernel Maintainer & Fellow, The Linux Foundation. The recording of the session can be viewed here and the slides can be viewed here. Upcoming Mentorship Webinars include:

    • How Do I Get Started with an Open Source Project?, with Clyde Seepersad, SVP & General Manager, Training & Certification, The Linux Foundation – December 2
    • Best Practices to Getting Your Patches Accepted, with Greg Kroah-Hartman, Kernel Maintainer & Fellow, The Linux Foundation – December 8
    • Open Source Licensing, with Steve Winslow, Director of Strategic Programs, The Linux Foundation – January 13, 2021
    • Kselftest, with Shuah Khan, Kernel Maintainer & Fellow, The Linux Foundation – Date TBA
    • Best Practices to be an Effective Maintainer, with Dan Williams, Linux Kernel Developer, Intel – Date TBA
    • Static Analysis & Tools, with Jan-Simon Möller, AGL Release Manager, The Linux Foundation – Date TBA
    • Coccinelle, with Julia Lawall, Senior Researcher at Inria – Date TBA

Additional sessions will continue to be added, covering topics such as: Smatch (Static Analysis Tool), Dynamic Analysis and Tools, Fuzz Testing, Kunit, and Tracing. To be alerted when registration is live for each session, please subscribe at the bottom of this page: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/lf-live-mentorship-series/

To learn more about the LF Live: Mentorship Series, please visit our webpage. To learn more about the Linux Foundation Mentoring Program, please click here. To learn more about the Linux Foundation Events, visit our website and follow us on Twitter and Facebook for all the latest event updates and announcements.

 

About The Linux Foundation
The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage.

Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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Media Contact:
Kristin O’Connell
The Linux Foundation
koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

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An open guide to evaluating software composition analysis tools

Mon, 11/02/2020 - 22:07
Overview

With the help of software composition analysis (SCA) tools, software development teams can track and analyze any open source code brought into a project from a licensing compliance and security vulnerabilities perspective. Such tools discover open source code (at various levels of details and capabilities), their direct and indirect dependencies, licenses in effect, and the presence of any known security vulnerabilities and potential exploits. Several companies provide SCA suites, open source tools, and related services driven as community projects. The question of what tool is most suitable for a specific usage model and environment always comes up. It is difficult to answer given the lack of a standard method to compare and evaluate such tools. 

The goal of this paper is to recommend a series of comparative metrics when evaluating multiple SCA tools. 

Download Whitepaper

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